Jack's Book: An Oral Biography of Jack Kerouac by Barry Gifford and Lawrence Lee 
submitted by Tom



This book can be summed up with one word: Love. I read this book about 20 years ago when I really had no understanding of the Beat Generation. So I missed the amount of love and respect that Kerouac's friends had for him and continued to have for him after his death. This book is more than it claims to be; it is an oral history of most of the Beat Generation with Jack as its center. From all the big wigs of Beat literary fame to the forgotten names of Kerouac's childhood friends and minor characters in his books, everything is covered.

In between each individual's comments is background filler added by Gifford and Lee. I think that they did a wonderful job of adding segue ways between comments. This allows a reader, who is new to the Beats, to understand the comments better. Some of the comments are very frank. This frankness makes the book a treasure. We get a view of the real Kerouac, who was many things to many people.

He was a sinner and a saint and it is all in here. In 1959, when On The Road was belatedly published, Kerouac became famous overnight. It was a fame that led many people to want a piece of him one way or another, and it led to his self-destruction and death at 47. He became a totally different person in the process. He became a drunk, who could be belligerent to all around him. But through it all, he loved his friends and they loved him.

He died in 1969 with little literary respect and still had not obtained it when Jack's Book was published in 1978. This book gives Kerouac the respect that he deserves as both a man and a writer, and for him the two were the same.

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