A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway 
submitted by Rob



“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.” - Ernest Hemingway


Ernest Hemingway – in my experience, the mere mention of his name brings forth gnashing of the teeth or near euphoria; there seems to be no middle ground when it comes to old Papa Hemingway. And perhaps this is a quality that is to be admired and sought, for is it better to be detested or loved rather than overlooked altogether? In any case and whatever one’s personal opinion of Hemingway, it would be difficult indeed to deny his importance or place in the Twentieth Century literary firmament.

Setting aside Hemingway’s epic novels and short stories, there is one piece of his writing, published posthumously in 1964, that provides the reader with a unique glimpse into American expatriate life of 1920s Paris, during the heyday of the Lost Generation. A Moveable Feast is comprised of twenty short sections, for a total of around two-hundred pages, providing an idea of what life with Hemingway was like at this time and at the start of his ascendancy from an unknown journalist for the Toronto Star to international fame as acclaimed author.

The reader is treated to personal encounters with all-too familiar names and personalities: Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, among others, and it is through these conversations that we are provided with a feeling of proximity to personages who, to most, seem unreachable – but no longer! Hemingway’s dedication to writing is also chronicled, allowing aspiring writers an idea of the sort of disciplined routine that good writing requires – the booze comes only after a prescribed amount of daily writing.

All in all, A Moveable Feast transports the reader to a particularly narrow time period between the First and Second World Wars in which myriad factors found throughout the world at that time produced writers, artists, and, alas, aspiring politicians, whose ideas and labors continue to affect the world today. With a new edition released in 2009 and revised by Sean Hemingway, Hemingway’s grandson from his second marriage to Pauline Pfeiffer (the first edition being edited by Mary Hemingway, Mr. Hemingway’s fourth and final wife), A Moveable Feast continues to stir controversy and delight the reader with tales from a bygone era.


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