We, the Drowned by Carsten Jensen 
submitted by Luke



In Marstal, Denmark, the men of the town have always gone to sea. The sea is in their blood and it calls to the fathers and sons of the town constantly, even as it leaves their bones on the floors of all seven seas. The sea dominates everything in town, much as the sea dominates other great maritime stories. Set over the span of a century, We, the Drown follows the lives of the town folk: the boys who fight amongst themselves, while also fighting with their school teachers and dreaming of the day they can go to sea; the men who go to war, who sail the four corners of the world to discover that the folly of human existence is as strong right in Marstal as it is in illegal trades in the South Pacific; the strong women left behind in Marstal to raise the children, live their lives, and be left to wonder why a ship fails to return to port. It follows the rise and fall of the town and how its citizens shaped this history. This book, a best seller in Europe and Carsten Jensenís debut novel, is the story of love, loss, warfare, sorrow, and joys, a well-rounded look at what happens in life.



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Read Your Way Around the World 
submitted by Debbe

Read Your Way Around the World

In September the library is encouraging reading groups and all readers across Louisville to explore books with roots in different countries and cultures with its Read Your Way Around the World program. Check out the library's Read Your Way Around the World Book List ! Titles from this list will be chosen for the Mayor's Book Club. Join us for the first meeting, Wednesday September 21 from 12-1 at the Main Library. We will be reading Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese.

I was one of many library employees that offered input as the reading list was developed. As I found books to suggest it was fun to go back and remember how such books have contributed to my understanding of many different cultures. Several of the most interesting books I have ever read are on the list:


Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang is a particular favorite. Changís multi generational history, tells us the story of her grandmother, who as a young girl lived in a society that was still binding the feet of its young girls; her mother and father who were Maoist revolutionaries and their subsequent experiences during the Cultural Revolution; and her own story as a young girl who briefly joined The Red Guard, before leaving it due to its extreme violence. Her stories introduced me in a very real way to Twentieth Century China and the effects of its policies on its people.


Brother, I'm Dying by Edwidge Danticat is a memoir that gave not only insight into life in the authorís birth country of Haiti, but also insight into the life of those who leave in search of a better life in the United States. Danticat tells the story of her father who, along with her mother, immigrates to New York when Danticat is four years old. Unable to bring her with them, she remained in Haiti, until the age of 12, living with her fatherís brother Joseph, a pastor in Port au Prince. I learned much about the upheaval in the late 20th Century in Haiti while reading an engrossing story of family love.

Palace Walk by Naguib Mahfouz is set in the early 20th century as Egyptians were attempting to become independent from the British Empire. The book focuses on an Egyptian family and the revolutionary political work of one of their sons. The novel offers insight into the role of both genders and the all encompassing power of the Father of the family. Mahfouz is a Noble Prize winner for literature and Palace Walk is the first volume in The Cairo Trilogy , the other two being Palace of Desire and Sugar Street

I hope you will use the list to expand your knowledge of the world and its people. Talking to others at the library about their recommendations has increased by at least a dozen my list of books I want to read.



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Along a Long Road by Frank Viva 
submitted by Natalie

Sometimes I feel funny about liking a book solely for the illustrations. My dilemma is possibly the inverse of ďnever judge a book by itís coverĒ. Lucky for you, Iíve decided to eschew that way of thinking and share a recently published work for young children simply because of its beautiful pictures.

Could a book designed entirely using computer software still be organic and elegant? Surprisingly, yes!

You may recognize the work of graphic designer Frank Viva who occasionally does covers for The New Yorker. If not, meet Along a Long Road whose title does nothing to mislead.

Inside, one seamless (pre-binding, 35 foot long!) scene is divided for readers into a panoramic glimpse of a two wheeled journey. A striking yellow bike trail courses throughout right alongside a lovely blue body of water. Both are accompanied by simple encouraging text. We meet towns and cities, pass through tunnels and go up hills, from day to shimmering moonlit night. We hit a bump in the road and fall off our bikes. Kids will see that itís easy to get back on and continue your adventure.




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Geraldine Brooks 
submitted by Debbe

Do you have a favorite author? This is a question librarians are frequently asked. I always found it hard to answer, as I eagerly await the latest title from many authors. Some are mystery writers, as I am anxious to reconnect with some of my favorite fictional crime solvers. Others I anticipate because I have enjoyed all of the books they have written. I could never pick just one.

However, now I find it easy to deliver a name when Iím asked this question. I answer Geraldine Brooks. She has only written four novels but she is a master of historical fiction. Her attention to the known past, while weaving remarkable narratives of hope, often amongst terror, leads to my enjoyment of her work.



When I read her first novel Year of Wonders, based on the 17th century English village Eyam, I was amazed by how adeptly she portrayed an English village caught in the deadly throes of plague. Her captivating story depicted both the bright and dark side of humanity as villagers struggled with feelings of fear, resentment and despair.



Her second novel March is based on the father from the novel Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott. Brookís research included the diaries and journals of Alcottís father Bronson. She created a character that is tested on many levels by the horrors of the Civil War. In 2006 this novel earned for Brooks the Pulitzer Prize in fiction.



Two years later Brooks published People of the Book, based on the famous Sarajevo Haggadah, which is housed in the National Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina. She creates a history of this illuminated book to chronicle anti-Semitism in Europe from the middle ages to modern times, while showing us how the goodness and courage of ordinary human beings can sometimes overcome barbarity.



In May her latest book Calebís Crossing was released. Set in the late 17th century, this tale is loosely based on the first Native American to graduate from Harvard. It recounts the lives of English settlers and Native Americans as they try to gain mastery over each other, while depicting the plight of women and men who triumph over their stereotypical gender roles. Geraldine Brooks again triumphs in weaving together an intriguing story with little known details from the past.



A former journalist for the Wall Street Journal, Brooks reported on the Middle East, Africa, and the Balkans. She has written two works of non-fiction, Nine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World or Islamic Women and a memoir, Foreign Correspondence.



If you read one of her books, I hope you enjoy her work as much as I do!

You can click here to reserve a copy of one of Brooks' titles.

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Trainsong by Jan Kerouac 
submitted by Tom



Trainsong is the second book by the only offspring of Jack Kerouac. And like Jack, Jan had many travels and many adventures. She has interesting encounters with Richard Brautigan, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs, but the heart of the book is in her relationships with her family, friends, and many lovers.

The person who looms largest in the book was both a famous writer and family member, her father Jack. They only met each other twice in their short lives (Jack died at 47, Jan at 44), but at every turn of her life she is controlled by his spirit. His spirit as a writer, man, and deadbeat dad follows her everywhere. Jack may travel deeper into the soul, but Jan goes deeper into the mind. Although she had every right to feel a deep anger for her dad, she understood him psychologically. He was a writer and that always came first.

In her life as a writer she often felt that same need or emotion. She gave birth to a stillborn child as a teenager and she realized that had the child lived her life as a writer and freedom as a woman would have been compromised. She would have had to make the same decision her father did. Although Jackís spirit was with her at all times, she had her own spirit too. That spirit fills this book with both joy and sadness.

This book will appeal to anyone who is deeply interested in the Beats or interested in what it was like to be a free spirited woman about a quarter of a century ago.

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