Teen Tech Tip of the Week #25: Computer Programming (Pt. II): Computer and Mobile App Development 
Last week we started to break the surface of computer coding a bit, and we introduced you to some free sites that allow you to learn the basics.

Some of you may be wondering, 'so how do the pros do it?' This week we will explore that question and give you the tools that you need to make and distribute your own apps.

Workflow Basics


Now that you have had a bit of time to key around with different programming languages, let's talk about what to do with the skills that you have begun to develop. We will discuss putting your skills to work through computer and mobile app development, but keep in mind that your skills are not limited only to building apps.

Apps are typically self-contained programs that perform a series of tasks related to the same overall function. Apps all have some sort of graphical user interface (GUI)--which is a fancy way of saying the buttons on the screen that the user pushes and the content being displayed.

Operating systems for devices have evolved to include easy access to a marketplace (Apple App Store, Google Play, and the growing Windows Store) rich with free and low-cost apps.

There is currently quite a bit of free software available designed to create apps for a variety of marketplaces, and the software is aimed at professional developers and hobbyists alike.

Though development varies across platforms, the basic concepts are all the same. Each platform has a specific set of tools called a software development kit (SDK) for creating apps. Those tools usually include the following: code editor, interface builder, frameworks (prefab code libraries), code debugger, a simulator that gives you a live test of your app, and some way of measuring how your app performs on a specific device.

To integrate all the tools, programmers utilize an integrated development environment (IDE). It may be helpful to think of the SDK as the tools necessary for building an app, and the IDE functions like the workbench keeping all the tools together and at close reach.

Many apps also require an application programming interface (API) to communicate to an operating system, a database, or some other piece(s) of software.

Below is a list of resources broken down into three popular development platforms Android, iOS, and Windows. Getting started can be a bit tricky, so I have included getting started resources and tutorials. The image above features an infographic detailing the general workflow for building an app. In the tutorials below, you will find similar charts more specific to your needs.

Android


MIT App Inventor - this browser-based IDE runs on Java and is a great to start. Tutorials found here.
Eclipse IDE and Android SDK (Bundle) - a more robust IDE from Eclipse
Building Your First App Tutorial - get started with installing and developing with this tutorial
Resources

iOS


iOS Developer Center - sign up and start making iPad, iPod and Mac apps
XCode - Apple's IDE and programs are written in Objective-C
Getting Started
ManiacDev - a one-stop for new and professional developers alike with libraries and tutorials

Windows


Visual Basic Express - Microsoft's IDE and apps are typically written in C# or C++
SQL Server Express - Microsoft provides you with a free database engine to power your apps
C# Tutorials - to get you started making apps with VS
MDSN - Microsoft's developer network with all the resources you need


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