Easy, At-Home DIY Crafts 
Looking for some super easy crafts to do? These are some of my favorite crafts, and Ė bonus - you should have all, or most, of these items already in your house!



Feeling like making some art for your room? Try these links!


Need something cool to wear? Try these links!


-Lynette, Teen Services, Shawnee Branch

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Teen Tech Tips #35 Tech License Manual: 10 New Tricks 
Welcome back to the blog! As you can see we have been enjoying some awesome featured Halloween reads, but now it's time to get back into some techy fun.




Our very first Teen Tech Tips blog post featured some keyboard short cuts to help you save time and work more efficiently. Click here for a review.

We are happy to share David Pogue's TED Talk from Febraury of this year as an update and addition.

Read More...

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Book Review of Playground: The Mostly True Story of a Former Bully 


Playground by 50 Cent is all about Butterball, a husky bully who thinks that name is much cooler than what is printed on his birth certificate. His teachers even call him Butterball. Heís the new kid at school and to keep kids from messing with him, he gets to them first. Heís a smart kid; he just does dumb stuff. Butterball's antics have gotten him into some serious trouble: suspension and required regular visits with a therapist. At home, things are just as disastrous.

His parents are not together. His father is not nearly as concerned with his son as he should be, and Butterball has completely lost the trust of his mother. Somehow, Butterball manages to weasel the trust of his mother once more, and she allows him to attend a party. Of course, he messes up. Thatís what Butterball does. He wouldnít be Butterball if he didnít. A plan did not work out, the joke is on him, and the tables have turned: he is now the victim of bullying, and thereís nothing he can do about it.

-Alexis Austin, Teen Services, Okolona Branch


[ 157 comments ] ( 2041 views )
Try Magical Realism for a Surreal Haunt this Halloween 
Itís almost Halloween, and that means many of you may be in the mood for something with a touch of paranormal. Iíll admit that horror is not my genre; I steer clear of books with too much gore. I prefer ghost stories, especially when you canít tell if the ghosts are real or imagined. When there is a thin line between the real and the surreal.

Right now, the master of surrealism for teens is Nova Ren Suma. For those unfamiliar with surrealism, it can be an acquired taste. Itís not quite realistic fiction and itís not quite fantasy or paranormal. Her books leave you with more questions than answers, and you may feel the story was dreamed rather than read. Suma says she was inspired by magical realism, which is a genre that introduces magical elements into an otherwise normal world. This isnít the magic of Harry Potter, but magic that exists at the edges of things. These books arenít fully paranormal, but as a reader you canít shake the feeling that something is amiss. If youíre the kind of reader that likes a solid ending that answers all of your questions, these may not be right for you. If you like open endings and enjoy the psychological heebie-jeebies, then you are in for a treat.



Nova Ren Sumaís YA debut, Imaginary Girls, was released in the summer of 2011. At its surface, this book is about the relationship between two sisters, our narrator Chloe and her enigmatic sister Ruby. There are parties by a reservoir, cute boys, and interesting new friends; but readers will quickly discover that things are not what they appear. The first oddity is the reappearance of a girl who drowned two years prior, but Chloe is the only one who seems to remember. There are also the stories Ruby tells about the former residents of Olive, a town flooded when the reservoir was built. Are the former residents still living beneath the water? This book isnít a traditional paranormal thriller, but it is certainly unsettling. There is a dreamy quality to Sumaís writing and this novel is unlike anything I have encountered in YA.

Favorite Quote:


ďRubyís stories didnít have morals. They meant one thing in the light and one thing in the dark and another thing entirely when she was wearing sunglasses.Ē



Sumaís most recent novel is 17 & Gone . The narrator, Lauren, is haunted by girls who disappeared the year they turned 17. Police never fully investigated the disappearances because it was believed the girls ran away willingly, but Lauren knows better. The missing girls keep appearing in her car, in her room, on the side of the road; and they want her to find out what really happened to them. The book is a mix of mystery, ghost story, and psychological thriller. There is a bit more action than in Imaginary Girls, but the same unsettling atmosphere remains. Determining what is real and what is just in Laurenís head may be the focus, but the real horror of the novel is why no one cared to investigate after the girls went missing.

Favorite Quotes:


ďI was 17. I was a girl. Didn't we matter?Ē

ďHow heartless it was for a girl to be forgotten and buried before there was even anything of her to put in the ground."

-Ruth Houston, Youth Services, Teen Underground, Main Library

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Vampires, vampires, vampires! Okay, do I have your attention now? Good. 


Do you like dystopia? Do you like vampires? Then I have the book for you: When the Sea Is Rising Red by Cat Hellisen. Yep you guessed it: itís vampire dystopia! In the society that is the backdrop for this story, marriages are arranged, class/caste is everything, and vampires are part of society. Felicita is a 17-year-old girl who is a member of the highest class, and her best friend, Ilven, has just committed suicide rather than marry the man her parents chose for her. When Felicitaís family announces that her own marriage has been arranged to a man she has absolutely no wish to marry, Felicita decides to fake her own death and run away. She hides in the cityís slums and becomes a dishwasher in a tea house. She also meets two very different guys: Dash, a charming bad-boy type, and Jannik, a vampire. And then, to top it all off, Ilvenís suicide has called up some sort of sea creature bent on destruction, and Felicita has to save her new friends, her family, and the entire town from the creatureís wrath.



Now for more vampires! This next book is a loose retelling of the Snow White fairy tale with vampires (and a little bit of The Godfather thrown in for good measure). Nameless by Lili St. Crow is about a girl named Camille. When she was a small child, Camille was discovered shivering in the snow by Enrico Vultusino, the head of one of the seven powerful vampire clans. Camille doesnít remember who she used to be or where all of her scars came from. And then she meets Tor, who has scars similar to her own, and wonders if he could be a link to her mysterious past.

Have a favorite vampire book or story? Share with us below.

-Emily Mauldin, Youth Services, Middletown Branch

[ 162 comments ] ( 2397 views )

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